Celia FremlinCelia Fremlin
The Hours Before Dawn Reprint 18th November
With No Crying
Listening In The Dusk
About the Author
Bibliography


The Hours Before DawnThe Hours Before Dawn
See Review. Louise Henderson, a young housewife and mother, is trying her best to tend to a husband, two small daughters and her constantly crying baby. She is so tired she fears she is becoming psychotic, as she can’t help but feel that their new lodger, a seemingly respectable schoolmistress, is a threat to her and her family.
"She excels in urgent story-telling, in faultless plotting, and above all in sheer good novel writing" New York Times
"Highly intelligent entertainment, beautifully written with wit and humour" Frances Fyfield

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With No CryingWith No Crying
A day-dreaming fifteen-year-old schoolgirl, from a very `good' home, becomes pregnant. She has encouraged a boy to seduce her, glories in her pregnant state, and is bitterly resentful when her parents talk her into having an abortion. To try to recapture her lost bliss, she pads herself up to appear pregnant, runs away from home, and finds refuge with a houseful of young squatters, most of whom are thrilled by the prospect of "their" baby. But Miranda has overdone the padding, making it appear that the baby's due any moment now. How can Miranda save face and carry off the situation?
The plot contains many twists and surprises, but all of them stem naturally from the characters and dilemmas of very real and troubled people. The novel also provides an incidental and implicit commentary on the present controversy concerning abortion. And, after a remarkable denouement which combines the intensely human with the tensely dramatic, the reader realises that Celia Fremlin has played absolutely fair from the very beginning.

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Listening In The Dusk
"For one mad moment, she had imagined that the wet red stains on her hands were indeed blood: that somehow, by some weird and virulent magic, her secret had come horribly alive during the hours of darkness and had crawled out from under the beams..."
Celia Fremlin is on excellent form in Listening in the Dusk, her first novel for several years.
Alice Saunders, striking out on her own following the traumatic break-up of her marriage, rents an attic-room in a ramshackle London boarding-house. Run along eccentric lines by the scatty landlady, the house contains a curious assortment of people. Most intriguing to Alice is Mary, a highly neurotic girl who is clearly terrified of something - or someone.
Alice must sort out her own life before she can help the deeply hostile girl, but what is Mary hiding from? Why does she react so violently to Alice's occupation of the attic? And who is the mysterious stranger asking questions about her? Mary may try to conceal the truth, but a secret so terrible must come out . . . especially when murder is involved.
Underlying the warmth and wit of this compelling mystery is a powerful streak of menace and fear. Listening in the Dusk will delight all fans of Celia Fremlin's sensitive but chilling novels.
This is her first novel since The Parasite Person: `A brilliantly sharp and funny book' The Times
`A delightful and masterly achievement' Financial Times
`A fascinating study of . . . the social psychology game, deepened and darkened by an expert' Observer
`Much wit, much horror, and, as always, from Fremlin, much astuteness on relationships' Listener

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Celia Fremlin
was educated at Berkhamsted School for girls and at Oxford. During the war she worked for the Mass Observation archives. Her first novel, The Hours Before Dawn, was awarded an Edgar by The Mystery Writers of America.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY - Celia Fremlin

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